Learning and Knowledge Management

CSVR is a knowledge based organisation where the commitment to constantly learn from our work and share knowledge with partners and the public are essential elements of our institutional identity. As such learning, monitoring and evaluation (LM&E) and knowledge management (KM) are fundamental aspects of our work.

Learning, monitoring and evaluation (LM&E) is a key strategic aspect of CSVR’s work. LM&E was introduced formally into CSVR in 2007 through the development of its clinical M&E system. This has proved to be an innovative and important system for CSVR for ensuring that CSVR is providing the best services possible to clients, to learn from the work that we are doing, and to improve the work on an ongoing basis. The quantitative and qualitative documentation and reflection have assisted in assessing the impact of the work done with individuals and families affected by violence and torture, as well as to shape and strengthen our intervention models.

The work initiated in the monitoring and evaluation of the clinical work within CSVR is being extended to all CSVR projects and teams. Through this work, there has been a significant contribution to the CSVR’s capacity to deliver evidence-based intervention services. Additionally, through the LM&E work, CSVR has ensured that it is able to monitor and adjust its operations based on the changing contexts, and it is accountable to donors and other stakeholders.

CSVR is a learning organisation. As such, CSVR prioritises knowledge management within the organisation. This involves incorporating the experience and knowledge of our staff and partners into its work and ensuring that policies, practices and procedures emphasise the learning of our staff and partners. We further use knowledge management to ensure that systems promote the learning that takes place within the organisation and by our partners. All of this is used to develop our staff and achieve our mission and strategic priorities.

 

Our LME and Knowledge Management systems are geared towards internal knowledge development through learning, reflection and documentation. Staff have internalised the LM&E practices as these serve their own individual and team learning needs and position them as experts who can articulate their experiences and share them with colleagues and other stakeholders.

The aims of the Learning and Knowledge Management team’s work are to:

  • Ensure that CSVR’s work is informed by evidence through documenting, reflecting on, and learning from its interventions
  • Ensure that CSVR remains at the cutting edge of intervention innovation by documenting and disseminating internally produced knowledge to appropriate audiences
  • Ensure that LM&E processes within CSVR are done in ways that contribute to a learning organisation and engage with a clearly articulated knowledge agenda
  • Engage with other local and international actors to promote effective and responsive LM&E processes for organisations working with violence prevention and healing

 

Specific projects undertaken by this team (in collaboration with other departments) include:

  • Clinical rehabilitation model development
  • Community intervention model development
  • Family intervention model development
  • Sharing lessons about LME with regional partners

 

Key publications produced by this team include:

Bandeira, Monica. August 2013. Developing an African torture rehabilitation model: A contextually-informed, evidence-based psychosocial model for the rehabilitation of victims of torture. Part 1: Setting the foundations of an African torture rehabilitation model through research.  Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation: Johannesburg

Bandeira, Monica. August 2013. Developing an African torture rehabilitation model: A contextually-informed, evidence-based psychosocial model for the rehabilitation of victims of torture. Part2: Detailing an African torture rehabilitation model through engagement with the clinical team. Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation: Johannesburg.

Goodman, R. Bandeira, M. 2014. Gender and torture does it matter? An exploration of the ways in which gender influences the impact of torture and rehabilitation services. Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation: Johannesburg.

Dix-Peek, Dominique. 2014. M&E for Improved Services: Setting Up and Implementing a Clinic-Based M&E System for the Rehabilitation of Torture Victims at the CSVR, Johannesburg. Johannesburg: Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation.

Walker, Caroline, and Dominique Dix-Peek. 2014. Understanding Contextually Based M&E and Knowledge Generation Systems in the African Region: Towards Effective Torture Rehabilitation Services in the Region. Johannesburg: Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation.

Dix-Peek, Dominique. 2014. Why Do Clients Stay in Counselling: A Comparative Analysis of Why Clients Stay for a Short or Long Time Using CSVR’s Psychosocial Services. Johannesburg: Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation.