Langa, Malose. 2011. A methodological dilemma: The street corner approach versus an institutional approach to accessing victims of torture and CIDT, Appendix D. Johannesburg: Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation.

CSVR developed two research projects to identify and profile survivors of current torture and cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment in the new South Africa. Two research methods were used to investigate patterns and effects of torture and victims’ access to medical, legal and psychosocial services - the street corner approach and the institutional approach. This report compares and contrasts the strengths and limitations of the institutional and street corner approaches as methods for accessing people who have been tortured recently in South Africa. This reflective report helped to inform the development of CSVR's model for community interventions to address torture detailed in Finding our way: Developing a community work model for addressing torture

Langa, Malose. 2011. Women empowerment: A case study of a refugee women’s group at the Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation, Appendix E. Johannesburg: Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation.

This report evaluates CSVR's work with a group of refugee women affected by torture and cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment. Over a period of six years, facilitators from CSVR met with a group of refugee women with the overall aim of facilitating the economic and social empowerment of these women and setting in motion increased integration into mainstream South African society. The intervention broke the stereotypes that cast refugee women as helpless victims who are in need of ‘hand-outs’ by galvanising their self-reliance and agency to form an organisation that will advocate for refugee rights and establish income-generating projects. This evaluation was conducted as part of the critical reflection process that fed into CSVR's development of a model for community intervention to address torture, detailed in Finding our way: Developing a community work model for addressing torture.

Langa, Malose. 2011. Guidelines for home visits, Appendix F. Johannesburg: Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation.

Home visits were undertaken as a stand-alone intervention as part of the CSVR's community project to address the psychosocial effects of torture among ex-combatants on the West Rand of Johannesburg. This report discusses the lessons, challenges and ethical dilemmas encountered in conducting home visits in 2008 and 2009. This evaluation process aimed to contribute to the development of a community intervention model for addressing torture, documented in Finding our way: Developing a community work model for addressing torture.

Kylie Thomas, Masheti Masinjila and Eunice Bere. 2013. "Political transition and sexual and gender-based violence in South Africa, Kenya, and Zimbabwe: A comparative analysis." Gender & Development 21(3): 519-532.

This article draws on research conducted in Kenya, South Africa, and Zimbabwe that focused on violence in the context of political transition. The paper examines the relation between political transition and sexual and gender-based violence in the three countries. The paper argues that it is critical to recognise sexual and gender-based violence as bound to systemic gendered inequality if such forms of violence are to be addressed and mitigated when periods of violent conflict end.

APDH, EIPR, CSVR, PRAWA, REDRESS. 2013. Pan-African Reparation Perspectives: Special Bulletin on Reparation for Victims of Torture in Africa. Issue 1, 26 June 2013. Actions pour la Protection des Droits de ’Homme’, Egyptian Initiative for Personal Rights, Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation, Prisoners Rehabilitation and Welfare Action, REDRESS.

APDH, EIPR, CSVR, PRAWA, REDRESS. 2013. Perspectives Panafricaines sur la Réparation : Bulletin spécial sur la réparation pour les victimes de la torture en Afrique. Numéro 1 - 26 juin 2013. Actions pour la Protection des Droits de ’Homme’, Egyptian Initiative for Personal Rights, Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation, Prisoners Rehabilitation and Welfare Action, REDRESS.

Brankovic, Jasmina. Roht-Arriaza, Naomi. 2013. African Union Transitional Justice Policy Framework in Practice: Implementing Accountability Measures. Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation: Cape Town.

Hamilton, Leigh and Van der Merwe, Hugo.  2013.  Peace, Justice and Accountability after War and Dictatorship Prospects for the African Context : Workshop Report 7-8 March, Cape Town, South Africa. Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation: Cape Town

Thomas, Kylie. 2013. Homophobia, Injustice and ‘Corrective Rape’ in Post-Apartheid South Africa. Cape Town: Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation and Centre for Humanities Research, University of the Western Cape.

This report offers a critique of the terms ‘corrective rape’ and ‘curative rape’ and argues for careful and nuanced application of the concept of ‘hate crimes’. The report focuses on a particular, individual life history and experience of trauma. It also argues for understanding gender‐based violence as structural violence.

Thomas, Kylie. 2012. The Power of Naming: ‘Senseless Violence’ and Violent Law in Post-Apartheid South Africa. Cape Town: Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation and Centre for Humanities Research, University of the Western Cape.

This report focuses on vigilantism, on the practice of ‘necklacing’ as a form of punishment, and on police violence in South Africa post-apartheid. The report engages with a series of questions about how popular forms of justice are imagined and enacted and about what the persistence of forms of violent punishment that originated during apartheid signifies in South Africa today. The report explores some of the complex reasons why people understand violence to be a means for achieving justice. It considers issues related to collective violence, violence connected to service delivery protests, and violence widely understood by perpetrators, onlookers, and researchers to be punitive in intent. It contests the idea that such forms of violence are ‘senseless’, arguing that to do so is to evade the question of how violence is bound to the political order, both past and present.